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Dragon Boating

Have you considered attending a dragon boat camp, but are unsure of whether you are up to the challenge of 5-6 straight days of paddling? Do you wonder what is involved in a camp that is so singularly focused on paddling? Have you inquired about a camp, but are nervous not knowing anyone who might attend? In this post, I’ve outlined a typical week at one of the camps I coached at the past two years in order to give you an idea what a dragon boat camp is all about. Keep in mind that

  This was my first full year training in a location that actually has seasons and, therefore, a true training cycle. I’m sure that sounds funny to most of you, but I began my paddling career in Miami. It’s a place where there are essentially two seasons: “really hot” and “even hotter”. There, we spent the whole year on the water and never thought twice about it. Now that I am living in a city with actual seasons which limit our on-water time, I see how beneficial it is to

I’m sure it’s happened to you. You’re on track with your training, you’re all set on your path and for some reason, you end up completely off the course that you thought you’d be on. They say “that which doesn’t kill you makes you stronger,” yet that is a tough pill to swallow when you are experiencing some type of obstacle in your training. As athletes, we typically view setbacks negatively because they can cause anxiety, depression, frustration, and even a loss of confidence and motivation. Setbacks can be discouraging,

In the middle of a recent training session I started thinking about how many parts of my body were hurting. I let my mind wander and it became my worst enemy. I started questioning why in the heck I put myself through the hour-long torture session we affectionately call “training,” especially at 5:45 in the morning. My mind started to take over and sadly I willingly let it. The truth is, paddling is a mental game. Obviously technique is important, and you can’t neglect the physical strength and proficiency needed

We train hard. We go to practice. We remain focused. We set goals. We work hard to achieve them. Yet inevitably there are things standing in our way, preventing us from improving at the rate we would like to. All too often, we focus on the things we think we need, rather than things we need to get rid of. Perhaps it’s time to take a look at things to eliminate in our life in order to see the improvements we so desperately desire. Here is a list of 10 things to

We all love pictures of ourselves paddling. A day or two after a race, most paddlers can likely be found scanning Facebook or Instagram for pictures of their team and hoping that they were captured in the awesome action shots. We are grateful for photographers like Ed Nguyen, Anne Zeng, Didi Fisher Weinreb, Jeff Holobushen, and many more who take fabulous pics at the regattas and share them online for us to see. And we all desperately hope there will be at least one epic shot where it looks like

Summer is almost here (for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere!) and most of us are already out on the water, enjoying increasingly warmer practices. We’ve dusted off our gear and are repairing or replacing equipment. We’re looking for new and better items that will help make our time on the water and at regattas more enjoyable. I’ve made a short list of items I love and recommend for your summer wish list. These are things that I have recently discovered and fallen in love with, or I have used for years and cannot do

Recently, my team held time trials on an OC 2. We had to paddle 200 meters as fast as possible while someone else steered the 2-man outrigger canoe. 200 meters sounds like a short distance, but when you are pulling someone else’s weight, it feels more like a 2k. (Read more about OC time trials in a previous post) I stayed at the site after my own trial to cheer on my teammates and to catch up with them, as I’d been out of town for a while. While watching Jen, one of my teammates who

When it comes to paddling, we all have our shortcomings. Some are within our control, while others are not. And some transgressions have more detrimental effects than others. Here is a list of seven deadly sins that can really cause you harm in the long run: 1. Not Warming Up Properly Too many paddlers jump into a boat for a training session or even a race without a sufficient warmup. Dynamic stretching at least 15- 45 minutes before hitting the water is crucial to get your muscles well-lubricated and ready to

If you’re like me, you love the adventure of traveling. When I can combine both paddling and traveling, it’s like an added bonus. Some of my favorite paddling destinations have been places where I can enjoy the race venue, and then spend a little time afterwards exploring the area. I’ve been fortunate enough to travel to so many wonderful locations that I might not otherwise have taken the time to check out. When I heard that there was a festival in Montana, I knew I wanted to learn more. Montana is the Rocky Mountain

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